THE LOGO PRINT

THE LOGO PRINT

For the Autumn 2020 collection, JOSEPH took inspiration from their logo and reworked it into a statement print to bring graphic expression to key pieces of the season.

Playing with enlarged shapes, blown up proportions and linear layering, the black letters contrast on rich saddle brown to enhance classic cashmere mix capes and knits.

EVOLUTION OF THE LOGO

Early 1970s

The JOSEPH logo first appeared in 1972 with the opening of the first store on London’s Kings Road. The logo was based loosely off the Extra Condensed typeface, designed by the Ludlow Typograph Company in the 1920s- 30s. The typeface was part of the Grotesque Sans-Serif family, a style of type with enduring functionality. Their slightly crude, less polished, and quirkier appearance compared to their more clinical and sleek contemporary counterparts, gave them more visual character. The geometric design was made up of simple lowercase letter forms of even bold widths which made it perfect for display type.

Late 1970s

By the late 70s, the JOSEPH logo had transfigured into a Handwriting Script typeface, a style of type which emulated casual modern handwriting. These casual cursive styles of flowing handwriting created a more personal, friendly, and approachable feel.

1980s

JOSEPH moved away from type that emulated handwriting and moved back into Grotesque Sans-Serifs. In the 1980s, JOSEPH began utilising Futura, a typeface designed by Paul Renner in 1927, released by Bauer Type Foundry.

The typeface was based on geometric shapes, near-perfect circles, triangles and squares. The strokes that make up each letter were almost evenly weighted, keeping the typeface consistent and highly legible.

Mid 1990s

Mid 1990s

During the 1990s, JOSEPH switched from Futura to Europa Grotesk, another Grotesque Sans-Serif typeface.

Europa Grotesk was less stripped-back in its design and does not follow the strict rules of geometry that Renner applied to Futura. Some features remain similar; each letter was almost evenly weighted, and some letters even resemble Futura greatly.

This logo was much tighter than the previous one designed in the 1980s. The letter spacing was drastically different, creating a fuller looking logo.

Late 1990s

Late 1990s

By the late 1990s, JOSEPH’s use of Europa Grotesk continued, however the logo’s design was altered. Rather than block capitals, the logo was created in lowercase letters, a look harking back to the 1960s-1970s, albeit in a more modern format.

The letter-spacing was decreased further still, creating an even fuller looking logo.

Early 2000s

Early 2000s

Once again, JOSEPH maintained its use of Europa Grotesk, switching to a lighter font style and changing back to block capitals. The lighter style created a much more elegant and delicate appearance. The tight letter-spacing prevailed, and the switch back to block capitals created a more uniformed and even looking logo.

Mid 2000s

Mid 2000s

The mid 2000s saw JOSEPH return to Futura. The typeface’s finesse and confidence certainly captured the brand’s identity perfectly.

The once tight letter-spacing was loosened to allow the logo to breath. The increased letter-spacing created a more relaxed and luxurious look and feel.

Present

Present

Since the mid 2000s, the logo has remained largely the same. The logo we are familiar with today is slightly tighter and more weighted in appearance.

Today, the iconic logo is seen around the world, often accompanied by the JOSEPH black and white stripe, and has become synonymous with modern, sophisticated and timeless luxury.

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