JOSEPH MEETS // FREDERIC FOREST



Paris based artist and designer Frédéric Forest, one half of the design duo Studio FRST



Design, interior, art direction and illustration -
where did it start?

I graduated from ENSCI/Les Ateliers in Paris. Whilst studying, I worked alongside the leather consultant Jocelyne Imbert on projects for Cartier leather goods. I moved on to Adidas where I designed for the brand's high end sports shoe range. In 2008, after working with designers Erwan and Ronan Bouroullec, Noé Duchaufour-Lawrance and Jean-Marie Massaud, I set up my own design studio with Clémentine Giaconia, FRST.

I started drawing before writing. Drawing is part of a design job, but during the evenings I do it just for me. It varies depending on mood, from fashion illustrations, children's books, storyboards or graphic novels.

Your work is very refined and monochromatic, how has your style developed?
I draw during the evenings, when the smartphone is off, no email. So I don't use colour because I can't see them very well. I do it simply with a black pen, fine of calligraphic, depending on mood. It's often without a precise subject and without expectation. I draw like I ski: catching the perfect line. It rarely comes at first attempt, you have to repeat it again and again. It's a training game and my palette is evolving.

Current/future projects?
I'm working on a personal website where I can sell my drawings and eventually I'd like to put together a book. Clémentine and I are working on a sofa range, and a light collection edited by Christophe Delcourt - Maison d'édition will launch in September. We're currently working on several furniture items too. We'll continue to work with luxury brands: a watch for a French Maison, accessories, tableware as well as a hotel project, and a new website!


Describe your work with Clémentine?
Clémentine is an interior and product designer. We design as a duet. It's useful to have a female and a male perspective; we cross our experiences and inspirations. We try to take on projects where object and space form a whole. We challenge ourselves and our limits; if we didn't then there'd be no intrigue. It's one of the advantages of working in tandem with someone, good ideas form by themselves and the bad ones seem to disappear along the way!

Since we started, we've worked across a range of disciplines from furniture and household objects to commercial stores, private restaurants, yachts and jewellery - creating several pieces for Hermès, Ligne Roset and Maison d'édition Christophe Delcourt.







Describe your creative process, what are your formative influences, where do you find your inspiration?

Inspiration is a smell, a sound, someone you cross, a tiny detail. My influences are around the edges - in fashion, photography, gastronomy, music, typography and dance. Auguste Rodin, Tilda Swinton, Pierre Hardy, the villas of Malaparte, architect Carlo Scarpa, choreographer Benjamin Millepied to Robert Mapplethorpe, Paolo Roversi, Maud Rémy-Lonvis - they help me to express new feelings and suggest new stories, whatever the scale of the project.

We've noticed your sketches often revolve around the female form or nature - is there a reason behind this?
I grew up in a very women-centric family! I draw women like they are, not idealised versions of themselves. I draw men too. I was born in Annecy, a city in the French Alps. Nature has always been my landscape - I like its form, its perfect curves, colours and scent. It's a very viral emotion.

Where does fashion fall in your creative interests?
I came to fashion through its image. My mother has always bought fashion and photography magazines, so as far I can remember my eyes have been fed by photographs with attitude such as Guy Bourdin, Sarah Moon or Helmut Newton. I started collecting Numéro, Vogue (French and Italian editions), The Face and few others during the 90's. I followed the works of Vinoodh & Matadin, Craig McDean or Solve Sundsbo. Now, my selection is focused on The Gentlewoman, Self Service, Kinfolk, Hole & Corner - Clever photographs, clever texts.

JOSEPH MEETS //
FREDERIC FOREST



Paris based artist and designer Frédéric Forest, one half of the design duo Studio FRST


Design, interior, art direction and illustration -
where did it start?

I graduated from ENSCI/Les Ateliers in Paris. Whilst studying, I worked alongside the leather consultant Jocelyne Imbert on projects for Cartier leather goods. I moved on to Adidas where I designed for the brand's high end sports shoe range. In 2008, after working with designers Erwan and Ronan Bouroullec, Noé Duchaufour-Lawrance and Jean-Marie Massaud, I set up my own design studio with Clémentine Giaconia, FRST.

I started drawing before writing. Drawing is part of a design job, but during the evenings I do it just for me. It varies depending on mood, from fashion illustrations, children's books, storyboards or graphic novels.

Describe your work with Clémentine?
Clémentine is an interior and product designer. We design as a duet. It's useful to have a female and a male perspective; we cross our experiences and inspirations. We try to take on projects where object and space form a whole. We challenge ourselves and our limits; if we didn't then there'd be no intrigue. This is one of the advantages of working in tandem with someone, good ideas form by themselves and the bad ones seem to disappear along the way!

Your work is very refined and monochromatic, how has your style developed?
I draw during the evenings, when the smartphone is off, no email. So I don't use colour because I can't see them very well. I do it simply with a black pen, fine of calligraphic, depending on mood. It's often without a precise subject and without expectation. I draw like I ski: catching the perfect line. It rarely comes at first attempt, you have to repeat it again and again. It's a training game and my palette is evolving.

Describe your creative process, what are your formative influences, where do you find your inspiration?
Inspiration is a smell or a sound, someone you cross, a tiny detail. My influences are around the edges: in fashion, photography, gastronomy, music, typography and dance. Auguste Rodin, Tilda Swinton, Pierre Hardy, the villas of Malaparte, architect Carlo Scarpa, choreographer Benjamin Millepied to Robert Mapplethorpe, Paolo Roversi, Maud Rémy-Lonvis - they enable me to express new feelings and suggest new stories, whatever the scale of the project.

We've noticed your sketches often revolve around the female form or nature - what's the reason behind this?
I grew up in a very women-centric family! I draw women like they are, not idealised versions of themselves. I draw men too. I was born in Annecy, a city in the French Alps. Nature has always been my landscape - I like its form, its perfect curves, colours and scent. It's a very viral emotion.

Where does fashion fall in your creative interests?
I came to fashion through its image. My mother has always bought fashion and photography magazines, so as far I can remember my eyes have been fed by photographs with attitude such as Guy Bourdin, Sarah Moon or Helmut Newton. I started collecting Numéro, Vogue (French and Italian editions), The Face and few others during the 90's. I followed the works of Vinoodh & Matadin, Craig McDean or Solve Sundsbo. Now, my selection is focused on The Gentlewoman, Self Service, Kinfolk, Hole & Corner - Clever photographs, clever texts.

Current/future projects?
I'm working on a personal website where I can sell my drawings and eventually I'd like to put together a book. Alongside this, Clémentine and I are working on a sofa range, and a light collection edited by Christophe Delcourt - Maison d'édition will launch in September. We're currently working on several furniture items too. We'll continue to work with luxury brands: a watch for a French Maison, accessories, tableware as well as a hotel project, and a new website!